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Thimphu Tshechu draws criticism

Thimphu Thromde allocated 440 stalls along Norzin Lam and Changlingmithang charging each stall Nu 1,000 per day and Nu 1,500 per day respectively during the Thimphu Tshechu from September 29 to October 2.

However, though the stalls drew crowds, there were observers who felt that the Tshechu could be done in a way that is aesthetically pleasing, engaging and creative.

Thimphu residents who visited the stalls along the Norzin lam said they were not happy with how the stalls were pitched.

A 28-year-old private employee said that when she went to visit the stalls the place was too crowded and she did not get a chance to look at the products displayed.

“The Thromde could plan properly for such festivals such as proper space for people to walk freely next time.”

Speaking along the same lines, Kinley Dema another private employee said all the tents did was make the streets look dirty.

“The crowds made me feel so dizzy that I had to return home,” she said.

A Thimphu resident said the festive mood was overshadowed by the sordidness. “The Tshechu could have been more creative.”

Thimphu Thrompon Kinlay Dorjee said that he does not entertain people’s complaints and the majority of people have appreciated. “Instead of appreciating what we have done, people complain; there will always be a few people who will spoil the show,” he said adding that allocation of the stalls was important because had they not been allocated, it would have been difficult to control people from doing business on the footpath.

“We left enough space for the people to walk on. Even the zebra crossing was left free for people to walk on,” he said, “If people come up with good suggestions, we will look into it and from next year do it more creatively. We would welcome any ideas.”

An artist said that elsewhere in the world like Europe, such occasions are celebrated creatively by inviting farmers to sell their organic products and exhibiting art and crafts and games.

“Stalls have a personal touch but in Bhutan, the festive season is all about business.”

He said that during such events, health officials and non-government organizations should be invited so that they can create awareness about issues and fulfill their objective of advocacy.

A shopkeeper said: “The Thromde could have done the allocation properly with more space for the people to walk around. Because of little space, they had little choice and it was our loss.”

Officer in-Charge of Thimphu traffic Captain Kencho Tshering said with three mega events going on, Annual Tshechu, Oral transmission of Kanjyur at Kuenselphodrang and Thimphu mela, traffic flow in the capital was affected.

“We received information about a month back, had to plan and accordingly we executed the plan. Though there were disturbances in the traffic, with cooperation from the public we did pretty well,” he said.

The stalls stretched from the junction of Jumolhari hotel until the handicraft emporium.

Chencho Dema from Thimphu

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